Abortion Photos

 

The use of victim imagery is widely debated. No matter the dispute, the underlying reason for pushback is almost always the same: Images awaken the conscience that many have worked diligently to silence. The abortion supporter is forced to acknowledge the violent, murderous “choice” they advocate and others are forced to acknowledge their inaction in the face of the American holocaust. The dismembered bodies of the victims of our culture of death cry out for justice more powerfully than anyone could ever do with words.

History provides ample evidence of the victim imagery’s effectiveness. The civil rights movement as we know it likely would not have happened without magazines and newspapers around the country printing images of Emmett Till’s disfigured corpse. Domestic abuse ran rampant among NFL players for decades, but only Ray Rice, whose battery was captured on camera ever faced significant penalty.

As their fellow human beings, we will never refrain from defending the defenseless to the best of our abilities and with the most effective means at our disposal. We simply must give the babies a platform from which to speak for themselves. Not doing so would be a dereliction of duty.

Click HERE to view our abortion victim signs and order them for use at your local abortion facility, college campus, or downtown square.

For photograph authenticity, see:

Further Resources

Jonathan Van Maren’s book Seeing is Believing reveals the tactics the abortion lobby fears the most, and explores the hidden nightmares of abortion industry workers. Pro-life people should take hope from this book because when the injustice of abortion is exposed, minds are changed and lives are saved.

In her New Oxford Review article, Graphic Images: An Apologia, Monica Migliorino Miller details the history and ethics of victim imagery and abortion photos.

Dr. Jacqueline Harvey’s statistical analysis shows the measurable impact of abortion photos.

All abortion images are copyrighted by the Grantham Collection or Narcis Virgiliu.